Machiavelli Type XIX.... $1210

A step closer to complex hilts for the Next Generation line, this sword has a hilt that was popular in Italy and Spain from the last quarter of the 15th C (or even slightly earlier) and into the 16th C. The hilt type (type 16 in Norman's classification) saw later developments of more elaborate form, but in early examples a stark simplicity is prevalent.

According to depictions in art, one can expect quite a number of different blade shapes mounted with this hilt: anything from slender rapier like blade to more sturdy cutting blades. We chose our type XIX blade for this sword as it is a classic combination.

To Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli (May 3, 1469 - June 21, 1527), swords of this type would have been quite familiar. Ever pragmatic with a keen eye for the right action at the right time, we thought it fitting to name the sword after him.

Swords like these were favoured by light skirmishers, but might also have been used by more heavily armoured troops.

In late 15th C art you can see how young blades around town are wearing swords with civilian clothes by this period.

Even though we have stressed the Italian connection by naming it after the famous political philosopher, it is quite probable that early conquistadores carried weapons much like this on their campaigns in the new world.

In character this weapon is a dedicated cutting weapon, but thrusting comes natural as well and it takes very little effort to land the point where it is intended. It has an overall weight and heft that invites quick and flowing style of swordsmanship. The edge geometry is rather fine, and is shaped according to a few well preserved type XIX blades in Italian collections, as well as a famous one in the Royal Armouries in Leeds.

This is not a sword for desperate armour bashing, but one that allows well aimed and well timed cuts and thrust with deadly efficiency. A dependable and agile sword for a swordsman with cool head and hot temper, perhaps. It shares the same blade as the Condottiere and the Kern of the Next Generation line.

A sword like this is like a last flowering of the European medieval knightly sword, hinting at things yet to come. A weapon of special character representing an important step in the evolution of the sword