Burgundian Type XVIII.... $935

This sword is named with an eye to the powerful and dynamic Burgundian lords of the 15th C. A few swords of this style have survived to our times. You can see examples in the Cluny museum in Paris, the Wallace Collection in London and the Schweizerischen Landesmuseum in Zürich. The sculpting of the hilts are expertly done, making the most of line, plane and volume. The effect is similar to the frozen growth of foliage in late gothic wood sculptures.

The guard shares some elements of design with the pommel, in the cutouts and ridges that define the shape. This is unusual in Medieval swords where the guard is normally quite distinct from the pommel in character. Sometimes there are exceptions and this seemed like a good occasion to let the whole hilt show variations of the same form elements.

Hilts like this, with strongly sculpted volumes, sit particularly well on blades that are defined by deeply concave edge bevels and prominent sharp midribs.

It can often be difficult to pinpoint a geographic origin for medieval sword types. Oakeshott believed that it would not be unreasonable to see a north west European association for type V pommels.

The Burgundian shares the same blade as the Kingmaker and has similar handling characteristics. The mass is mostly centered to the upper half of the blade, close to the hilt and in the rather massive pommel. The thick spine of the blade provides good stiffness. This means the sword is maneuverable and powerful, with good thrusting capabilities.